Kyoto – Culture and Traditions

For long I wanted to witness firsthand the Japanese culture, especially the old one when Samurais were part of their society. In the Japanese culture everything is done with a meaning and it’s easy to understand this just by walking around in Kyoto. People bow to say “hello”, “thank you” and “goodbye” even if they do not know the person. Several times I looked directly to people and they smiled and made a bow, and I, embracing their culture, did the same.

Before we came to Kyoto we stayed 1 night in Tokyo and we noticed the culture there, but in Kyoto it seems that the older or more traditional aspects of the Japanese culture are more present everywhere.

We planned to stay the first night in a Capsule Hotel, the “9 Hours”, but when we got there we found out that the luggage was going to stay in the hotel lobby without any locks or any kind of security. Don’t get me wrong, we think that Japan, or at least Kyoto and Tokyo are very safe. But our luggage is the only thing we have on this trip so we could not risk it, we decided to stay in a normal (Japanese normal) hotel, so no capsule experience unfortunately. But one of the Japanese normal hotels was a ryokan.

CIMG4973 IMG_4738

Kyoto is the city to visit temples and shrines to understand that part of their culture, so we went to several. Once we found a temple with English information that taught us e gave it a try. So we did our prayer in accordance to local culture (bow once, throw a coin, ring the bell, bow twice, clap twice, pray, bow once) and we took our pictures, have a look below at the pictures of some of the temples and shrines we visited in Kyoto.

  • Rokkaku-do Temple
CIMG4848 CIMG4849
 
CIMG4855 CIMG4856
 
CIMG4859 CIMG4861
 
  • Fushimi Inari-Taisha Shrine

IMG_4763              IMG_4753

CIMG5004              IMG_6565

CIMG4999              IMG_6559

CIMG4991 CIMG4988

CIMG4987

  • Yasaka Shrine
CIMG5102
 
CIMG5103 CIMG5105
 
  • Kinkaku-ji Temple
IMG_4770
 
CIMG5047                         IMG_6597
 
              IMG_6601                                   IMG_6589

We were really excited to experience the tea ceremony, something Elsa meant to do for a long time. In this ceremony everything has a meaning and a reason to be done that way. Some curiosities:

  • The ceiling where the host stays in the tea room is lower then the one where the guests stay and that is because the host should always be humble and shall bow when coming in the room;
  • The entrance for the guests in the tea room is very small, this was a way to prevent unwelcome people and their swords (samurais) from coming in;
  • In one of the corners there is an area with a painting that is changed 4 times a year, each time the painting will represent the season of the year (at least in the room we visited);
  • That corner has 4 different types of wood which gives it diversity;
  • When the door of the guest entrance is not completely closed it means that the room is ready to serve other guests;
  • The last guest to enter the tea room needs to slam the door, this way the host knows that everyone is inside. When leaving the last one needs to slam the door and that means everyone has left;
  • When drinking the last sip of tea one needs to make a slurping noise, that means to the host that you liked the tea;
  • When serving the tea, the host turns the cup of tea in a way that the most beautiful part of the cup is shown to the guest.

There are much more meanings for each part of the tea ceremony, you need to experience to understand how beautiful it is. We did not take many pictures, we decided to enjoy the moment and listen to every word the host was telling us.

CIMG5256 CIMG5254

CIMG5255 CIMG5257

The last picture can be seen a big entry, that did not exist it was a wall, it is only like this for people to see the room before entering through the small dor on the side (right lower corner of the room in the picture).

We visited the Nijo Castle that in our days also houses the former Katsura-no-miya palace that was moved from its original location.

CIMG4877            IMG_6505

CIMG4884            CIMG4882

CIMG4905 CIMG4913

CIMG4914

The Kyoto Imperial Park is one of the attractions of Kyoto; the Kyoto Imperial Palace is located here but visits to the inside are not easy to get and need to be booked well in advance, something we did not manage to do.

DCIM114GOPRO CIMG4932

CIMG4930 CIMG4927

In the park next to the palace there is a tree with more or less 300 years where, according to the identification plate, a samurai died a glorious death, read the plate below.

DCIM114GOPRO DCIM114GOPRO

One of the things that we really loved and probably most bonsai lovers will love is that almost all street trees are treated as bonsais, specially the ones in the parks, did not matter how big they were. At the Kyoto Imperial Park we saw from the outside of the Sento Palace 3 men on top of a big pine tree taking care of each branch of that tree, something you don’t see anywhere else in the world.

DCIM114GOPRO DCIM114GOPRO

DCIM114GOPRO CIMG5048

CIMG5088

In most of the cities we have been to we visited a high view point to see the city from above. The Kyoto Tower is only 100m tall until the floor people are allowed to visit but that was enough to see the whole city because there are not many tall buildings there. It had an amazing view and it has something that other towers do not have, free tower binoculars. From those we saw from far some of the temples we visited and others that we did not visit.

IMG_6543 CIMG4955

CIMG4956 CIMG4963

CIMG4965 CIMG4971

CIMG4944 CIMG4945

CIMG4946 CIMG4947

One of the nights we decided to have dinner in Gion. The area is beautiful and continues to have those Japanese small buildings and narrow streets that you see in Samurai movies. These buildings are mostly restaurants in the ground floor, probably the floors above are used got habitation purposes.  I would have loved to see a traditional geisha but looks like it is very rare that you see one and we did not have that luck.

CIMG5106             IMG_4785

CIMG5107 CIMG5110

For souvenir shopping we went to the street Shijo-dori. It is a very long street with lots and lots of expensive and not so expensive shops. We also found a perpendicular street with more affordable small stores, the Shopping Arcade. It is a covered street so you can go there even when it is raining.

CIMG5111 CIMG5112

CIMG5260 CIMG5261

In summary Kyoto was the city where we found traditional Japanese culture more instilled in the way of life. Respect for others, humility and meaning to each thing they do. Probably the whole world needs to learn more about the good aspects of this culture…

Bandeira Portuguesa

Há muito tempo que eu queria ver a cultura Japonesa em pessoa, especialmente a cultura antiga quando os Samurais ainda faziam parte da sociedade Japonesa. Nesta cultura tudo tem um significado e é muito fácil compreender isso quando se anda nas ruas de Quioto. As pessoas fazem vénias para dizer “olá”, “obrigado” e “adeus” mesmo que não conheçam a pessoa. Muitas vezes eu olhei directamente para pessoas e elas sorriam e faziam uma vénia, eu, abraçando a sua cultura, fazia o mesmo.

Comparando com Tóquio parece que a cultura antiga e mais tradicional está mais presente em tudo em Quioto.

Planeámos ficar a primeira noite num hotel de cápsulas, o “9 Hours”, mas quando lá chegámos verificámos que a bagagem ficava na entrada do hotel sem cadeados ou outra forma de segurança. Não me interpretem mal, nós achamos que o Japão, pelo menos Tóquio e Quioto, são seguras. Mas a nossa bagagem é a única coisa que temos nesta viagem e não quisemos arriscar por isso decidimos ficar num hotel normal (normal para japoneses), por isso a experiência num hotel cápsula fica adiada, infelizmente. Um dos hotéis onde ficámos foi num “Ryokan”.

CIMG4973 IMG_4738

Quioto é a cidade para visitar templos e santuários para entender essa parte da cultura Japonesa, logo visitámos vários. Assim que encontrámos um templo com informação em inglês sobre as orações decidimos experimentar. Neste santuário fizemos a nossa reza de acordo com a cultura local (vénia 1 vez, atirar uma moeda, tocar o sino, vénia 2 vezes, bater palmas 2 vezes, rezar, vénia 1 vez) e tirámos fotografias. Vê em baixo fotografias de alguns templos e santuários que visitámos em Quioto. 

  • Templo Rokkaku-do
CIMG4848 CIMG4849
 
CIMG4855 CIMG4856
 
CIMG4859 CIMG4861
 
  • Santuário Fushimi Inari-Taisha

IMG_4763              IMG_4753

CIMG5004              IMG_6565

CIMG4999              IMG_6559

CIMG4991 CIMG4988

CIMG4987

  • Santuário Yasaka
CIMG5102
 
CIMG5103 CIMG5105
 
  • Templo Kinkaku-ji
IMG_4770
CIMG5047                         IMG_6597
              IMG_6601                                   IMG_6589
Estávamos muito entusiasmados com a cerimónia do chá, algo que a Elsa queria fazer há muito tempo. Nesta cerimónia tudo tem um significado e um porquê de ser feito daquela maneira. Algumas curiosidades:
– O tecto da sala de chá é mais baixo na entrada do anfitrião, porque este tem sempre que ser humilde e fazer uma vénia quando entra na sala;
– A entrada das visitas é muito pequena, desta maneira era impossível entrar na sala com espadas;
– Um dos cantos da sala tem uma reentrância onde é pendurada uma pintura com a estação do ano (pelo menos a sala de chá que visitámos);
– Esse canto tem 4 tipos diferentes de madeira para mostrar diversidade;
– Quando a porta de entrada dos convidados na sala de chá não está completamente fechada, significa que a sala de chá está pronta para o próximo convidado;
– O último a entrar na sala tem de bater com a porta para assinalar que todos os convidados entraram. A sair é o mesmo, o último bate com a porta para assinalar que todos saíram da sala;
– No último golo de chá o convidado faz barulho a beber, o que significa que gostou do chá;
– Quando o anfitrião serve o chá, este vira a parte mais bonita da chávena para o convidado.
Existem muitos mais significados na cerimónia do chá, tens de a fazer para perceberes o quão bonita é. Não tirámos muitas fotografias, decidimos aproveitar o momento e ouvir a explicação que a anfitriã estava a dar.

CIMG5256 CIMG5254

CIMG5255 CIMG5257

Na última foto vê-se uma entrada grande, esta não existe numa sala de chá, apenas existe nesta sala para que as pessoas possam ver o interior da sala antes de entrar. No canto inferior direito vê-se uma pequena portinhola, essa é a entrada dos convidados.

Visitámos o castelo Nijo que hoje em dia é também a localização do palácio Katsura-no-miya que foi movido para o espaço há alguns anos.

CIMG4877            IMG_6505

CIMG4884            CIMG4882

CIMG4905 CIMG4913

CIMG4914

O Parque Imperial de Quioto é uma das atracções de Quioto. Neste está localizado o Palácio Imperial de Quioto mas visitas ao seu interior não são fáceis de se obter e têm de ser reservadas com muito tempo de antecedência, algo que não conseguimos fazer.

DCIM114GOPRO CIMG4932

CIMG4930 CIMG4927

No parque perto do palácio está uma árvore com cerca de 300 anos onde, de acordo com a placa, perto dela morreu um samurai uma morte cheia de glória, lê a placa abaixo. 

DCIM114GOPRO DCIM114GOPRO

Uma das coisas que gostámos muito e provavelmente os amantes de bonsais vão gostar, é o facto de quase todas as árvores nas ruas serem tratadas como bonsais, especialmente as árvores dos parques, e não interessa o tamanho delas. No Parque Imperial de Quioto vimos pelo lado de fora do Palácio Senso 3 homens em cima de um grande pinheiro a tratar de cada ramo da árvore.

DCIM114GOPRO DCIM114GOPRO

DCIM114GOPRO CIMG5048

CIMG5088

Na maioria das cidades que temos estado visitámos um dos pontos mais altos da cidade pela paisagem. A Torre de Quioto tem apenas 100m de altura no ponto que as pessoas podem subir mas foi suficiente para ver a cidade inteira porque não existem muitos prédios altos em Quioto. A paisagem é fantástica e esta torre tem algo que as outras não têm, binóculos grátis. Destes vimos alguns dos templos que visitámos e outros que não visitámos desta vez.

IMG_6543 CIMG4955

CIMG4956 CIMG4963

CIMG4965 CIMG4971

CIMG4944 CIMG4945

CIMG4946 CIMG4947

Numa das noites decidimos jantar em Gion. A área é linda e continua a ter os edifícios Japoneses e as ruas estreitas que se vê nos filmes de samurais. Este edifícios são maioritariamente restaurantes no R/C, provavelmente o andar em cima é para habitação. Adorava ver uma geisha nas ruas mas pelos vistos são raras as que andam na rua e nós não tivémos essa sorte.

             IMG_4785

CIMG5107 CIMG5110

Para comprar recordações fomos à rua Shijo-dori. É uma rua longa cheia de lojas caras e algumas não tão caras. Nós fomos a uma rua perpendicular à última que tem muitas lojas pequenas mais baratas, a area chama-se “Shopping Arcade”. É uma rua coberta logo pode-se andar às compras mesmo quando chove.

CIMG5111 CIMG5112

CIMG5260 CIMG5261

Em resumo Quioto foi a cidade onde encontrámos a cultura tradicional Japonesa mais presente no dia à dia. Respeito pelos outros, humildade e significado em tudo o que fazem. Provavelmente o mundo inteiro precisa de aprender mais sobre os aspectos positivos desta cultura…

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Kyoto – Culture and Traditions

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s